BBC Antiques Roadshow at the Spa complex - Watch the video

SCARBOROUGH’S Spa was a hive of activity and excitement as the BBC’s Antiques Roadshow came to town.

Hundreds of people walked through the doors eager to get their hidden treasures valued, or even spot a few well-known faces from the popular TV show.

The Antiques Roadshow comes to Scarborough ,Fiona Bruce gets ready for the day ahead .Picture Richard Ponter.121832a.

The Antiques Roadshow comes to Scarborough ,Fiona Bruce gets ready for the day ahead .Picture Richard Ponter.121832a.

Queues spiralled throughout the Grand Hall with bags of varying shapes and sizes protruding from the crowds. Some people had waited in line outside the South Bay venue from 7am.

It was the first visit to Scarborough for the show’s presenter, Fiona Bruce.

She said: “When you go to different locations you see items brought along that are associated with the history of that area. I’m looking forward to seeing what comes up here in Scarborough, where there is a strong history of maritime, shipping, and Scarborough fair.

“It’s a beautiful town, with the little port and the castle. I hadn’t realised until coming here what an important port it had been. It’s fascinating when you look at the history of this place, and hopefully we’ll find some charming pieces today that reflect this.”

The Antiques Roadshow comes to Scarborough ,view of the main hall.Picture Richard Ponter.121832c.

The Antiques Roadshow comes to Scarborough ,view of the main hall.Picture Richard Ponter.121832c.

A total of 1,600 items were brought for valuation, with two particular items getting top-end valuations.

The first was a collection of Bamforth postcards, valued in the tens of thousands of pounds. The collection was brought in by the great-great- grandson of Douglas Tempus, who was one of the artists who created the iconic images on the famous postcards.

Also attracting a high price tag was a racing suit which belonged to world champion racing driver James Hunt. The suit had been worn by Hunt when he won the 1976 Hockenheim race, and was valued at between £6,000 and £7,000.

A variety of items were unveiled over the course of the day, attracting excitement from many of the show’s experts.

The Antiques Roadshow comes to Scarborough ,expert Eric Knowles views an artefact .Picture Richard Ponter.121832d.

The Antiques Roadshow comes to Scarborough ,expert Eric Knowles views an artefact .Picture Richard Ponter.121832d.

Furniture expert Christopher Payne had his eye caught by a number of pieces including a sculpture he was researching, and a low dresser by furniture maker “Mouseman” Thompson, which was valued at around £6,000.

He said; “The dresser had a wonderful story behind it. Its owner was given a pair of Mouseman bookends on her 21st birthday which started her collection. She is 90 later this month. What is fantastic is that she knew Robert Thompson, and he told her the story behind the mouse. She was able to confirm for us a lot of the stories about his work.”

Working on the Roadshow reception desk was Lloyd Farmar. He said: “We have seen some fantastic local art by Scarborough artists. We always like to see local things when we come to a venue, it always sets the scene for us. We have also seen a great chap with a wonderful ceramic collection who is really passionate about his pieces. We’ve seen some 20th century collections too and some good silverware. It has been a real mixed bag, which is what the roadshow is all about.”

Yesterday’s filming will be split into two shows, due to be broadcast as part of the next series over the autumn and winter of 2012-13.