Potato merchant expansion set to neighbour ancient monument

**MUST CREDIT PICTURE:  Ian Martindale/University of York**''Research by University of York archaeologists at one of the UK's most important Early Mesolithic sites is to be highlighted by the Channel 4 programme Time Team. Presenter Tony Robinson and a film crew joined researchers led by Dr Nicky Milner, of the University's Department of Archaeology, at an excavation at Flixton Island, an Early Mesolithic site near Star Carr, Scarborough. Star Carr is where, in 2010, archaeologists from York and the University of Manchester announced the discovery of Britain's earliest surviving house dating back to 9,000 BC. Picture shows Time Team filming at Flixton Island. Picture: Ian Martindale/University of York
**MUST CREDIT PICTURE: Ian Martindale/University of York**''Research by University of York archaeologists at one of the UK's most important Early Mesolithic sites is to be highlighted by the Channel 4 programme Time Team. Presenter Tony Robinson and a film crew joined researchers led by Dr Nicky Milner, of the University's Department of Archaeology, at an excavation at Flixton Island, an Early Mesolithic site near Star Carr, Scarborough. Star Carr is where, in 2010, archaeologists from York and the University of Manchester announced the discovery of Britain's earliest surviving house dating back to 9,000 BC. Picture shows Time Team filming at Flixton Island. Picture: Ian Martindale/University of York
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An archaeological report has confirmed the expansion of a potato merchant operation on one of the country’s most important Ancient Monuments can go ahead.

Scarborough Council’s planning committee met in March to determine an application in relation to Star Carr near Seamer, which has been dubbed the most significant finding from the Mesolithic period.

The application, from James Stockdale Ltd, which seeks to relocate the business’s entire operation to a farm on the site, was deferred by councillors who felt more information was needed on the impact the development would have on the site’s archaeological significance.

The proposal includes the installation of a new fuel tank, the relocation of a workshop, a new concrete paved area for vehicle washing, and installation of electronic security gates.

The matter is due before the planning committee again on Thursday following the completion of an archaeological report, which outlined a number of recommendations to ensure the development can go ahead without putting the site at risk.

In a report to the committee, recommending the application for approval, planning services manager David Walker said: “Following the advice given by North Yorkshire Archaeological Service and English Heritage, the agents commissioned an archaeological report, which has confirmed that deposits of archaeological and palaeoenvironmental importance are on site, and suggests a number of recommendations, including methods of excavation and a continuous watching brief during certain parts of works, as well as a full assessment report.

“As a result the Archaeological Service and English Heritage are happy for the development to proceed, in line with that report, and as a result, a condition has been added to ensure the recommendations of the report are carried out.”