The beach to be dug up - over summer

The North Bay mini-roundabout is to be demolished this summer and a trench will be excavated on the beach in front of the slipway. Picture by Neil Silk. 130720
The North Bay mini-roundabout is to be demolished this summer and a trench will be excavated on the beach in front of the slipway. Picture by Neil Silk. 130720

One of Scarborough’s main tourism spots is set to be dug up during the peak summer season.

From June to October – a longer period than planned – North Bay will be a building site, with the roundabout axed and a trench dug on the beach.

Summertime blues on way for North Bay

North Bay traders say they are “frightened” about the impact excavation works will have on their businesses during the summer season.

This week Yorkshire Water revealed the bathing water improvement scheme at Peasholm Gap had been hit by delays.

While shop owners were expecting disruption until July, they were “shocked and “upset” when they learned it could continue until October.

They fear they will now have to put up with tall boards in front of their businesses that will fence-off works, as well as disruption to traffic flow, noise and dust. Luke Austin, owner of Dexter’s Surf Shack and Waves Cafe, said: “It’s frightening. No one is going to want to sit and drink coffee while dust is flying around.

“When I was told at the start there might be changes and delays, I thought maybe two to five weeks, not three months. We have already suffered from the second worst summer on record last year.”

As part of the scheme, a 70m long and 3m wide trench will be dug on the beach in front of the slipway.

The work will be carried out between July and August, but as a result of the delays it will now coincide with work, which will see the mini-roundabout dug up so a pipe can be installed.

Gaeleen Bibby, owner of North Bay Gifts, said: “There couldn’t be a worse time for a seaside resort.”

A Yorkshire Water spokesman said the work had to be carried out in summer to ensure the firm’s project would be completed to meet the stricter European bathing water standards, which come into force in 2015. Improvements to the design, which mean an existing Victorian sewer will no longer need to be opened up, and phasing the work to avoid peak holiday periods have also put the scheme back.

Meanwhile, the firm has unveiled plans to replace the roundabout with a pedestrian area, however it will now go back to the drawing board after residents and businesses expressed concerns over traffic issues, including buses being able to turn.