Charity takes flight in honour of mum

Animal House Wildlife Welfare  Bird Sanctuary. Trevor Buckroyd works with his birds. pic Richard Ponter 161910e

Animal House Wildlife Welfare Bird Sanctuary. Trevor Buckroyd works with his birds. pic Richard Ponter 161910e

0
Have your say

A Scarborough man has kept alive his mother’s legacy and now hopes to raise £10,000 to secure the future of a charity with a dream of opening a public centre.

Cynthia Buckroyd founded Animal House Wildlife Welfare charity which focused on rescuing and rehabilitating injured animals.

Animal House Wildlife Welfare  Bird Sanctuary.Trevor Buckroyd and Eagle Owl Gandalf.  pic Richard Ponter 161910d

Animal House Wildlife Welfare Bird Sanctuary.Trevor Buckroyd and Eagle Owl Gandalf. pic Richard Ponter 161910d

Sadly, Cynthia passed away in 2011 and her son Trevor Buckroyd and her family stepped in to keep her legacy and Animal House alive.

Five years on and the charity now specialises in birds of prey – something Trevor has always had a passion for.

He said: “Mum cared for animals from the size of a mouse to as big as a deer. We decided to stick to birds of prey because I know more about them and how to care for them.”

Trevor first followed in his mum’s footsteps as a young boy and he was often taking in injured birds.

Animal House Wildlife Welfare  Bird Sanctuary.Overview of the sanctuary. pic Richard Ponter 161910k

Animal House Wildlife Welfare Bird Sanctuary.Overview of the sanctuary. pic Richard Ponter 161910k

Aged 12, Trevor was presented with the inaugural Jim Ward Conservation Trophy for his dedication in caring for birds.

“He’ll take in birds that I would have put down 
immediately, birds that haven’t got any chance of survival, and he’ll work a miracle,” Mr Ward told the Scarborough Evening News in 1989.

Animal House are currently caring for 41 birds –which means there is 41 mouths to feed. A European Eagle Owl, such as Gandalf, 
can eat about one and a half rabbits worth of food per day.

Kayleigh Spencer, volunteer and Cynthia’s niece, said: “We go through 40 rabbits per week, 250 turkey poult as well as supplementing their diet with quail to give them a more varied diet and administering multi-
vitamin and calcium supplements to the food to ensure they are getting everything they need.

“It currently costs us around £500 per month in just running costs so we need to also raise that first in order to keep the charity going.”

The charity cares for birds that have been injured or are no longer wanted by their owners.

Trevor said: “We try to rehome birds but we vet the owners, we won’t just let any-
body have one. Hopefully then they will never have to be rehomed again.”

They have also recently received Accredited Raptor Rescue Rehabilitator status to be able to release injured birds they have taken in back into the wild.

The charity hope to raise £10,000 to buy a piece of land to secure their future as they rely solely on donations and doesn’t receive any grants or funding.

They hope to one day be in a position where they can open a centre so the public can visit all year round. At the moment Animal House attend fairs and shows to raise funds.

Kayleigh added: “When our founder Cynthia Buckroyd passed away we vowed to keep the charity going and what better way for her legacy to go on than to cement the charity’s future and continue the work she gave her whole life to.”

Donate to the charity at www.gofundme.com/23kfcn24

Visit their website at www.animalhousewildlifewelfare.com/c or call Trevor on 07807 038553.