Could council face double cost over planning?

Scenesetters'Work starts on the new housing development at West Garth in Cayton'Picture by Neil Silk  130316a'15/01/13
Scenesetters'Work starts on the new housing development at West Garth in Cayton'Picture by Neil Silk 130316a'15/01/13
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Work is now underway to build 162 homes in Cayton as another appeal against local authority planning decisions looms.

Last week the Scarborough News reported that the Planning Inspectorate overhauled a decision by Scarborough Council’s planning officers to refuse the Barratt Homes development at West Garth.

The appeal was upheld on the basis that councillors ignored the authority’s own policy which states they will be guided by the Environment Agency and Yorkshire Water - both of which supported the application.

Alongside the appeal from Barratt Homes is an appeal by Scarborough Rugby Club which is looking to the Planning Inspectorate to overturn the planning authority’s refusal of music at games.

The clubs application for its Scalby Road ground was turned down despite being supported by Environmental Health.

The appeal, which includes an application for costs, is in the later stages with a decision due shortly.

Meanwhile after winning their appeal Barratt Homes has already started work on site in Cayton.

Peter Morris, development director for Barratt said: “We are thrilled by the Planning Inspectorate’s decision as we believe our plans for the West Garth site will bring much needed housing to the area as well as economic benefit, which includes many new jobs and training opportunities.

“After some unfortunate delays due to decisions by planning councillors in direct contradiction to the recommendation of qualified council officials, we are delighted to announce that construction work began on this month and we would like to thank those who supported our proposals throughout the whole process.”

However Cayton Residents Action Group still has concerns about drainage onsite, and the possible contamination of an underground aquifer.

Residents have written to the Environment Agency urging it to reassess its support of the proposed drainage.