Former traffic cop strikes blow in crusade against parking charges

Keith Hughes pictured at the junction of Avenue Road and Seamer road where the lack of correct road signs have made some parking restrictions unenforceable.'113552a. Picture by Kevin Allen
Keith Hughes pictured at the junction of Avenue Road and Seamer road where the lack of correct road signs have made some parking restrictions unenforceable.'113552a. Picture by Kevin Allen

SCARBOROUGH’S former top traffic cop has struck another blow for motorists in his crusade against illegal parking charges.

Former police traffic sergeant Keith Hughes, an acknowledged expert on all aspects of parking regulations, has forced North Yorkshire County Council to admit fault with road signs on one of the busiest sections of road in the town.

In a letter to Mr Hughes, David Bowe, the county council’s corporate director of business and environmental services, said: “As a result of your recent correspondence about the signing on the Seamer Road Urban Clearway I requested that a review of the signing scheme was undertaken.”

Mr Bowe confirmed the review had revealed “deficiencies” in the signing in Seamer Road, adding that three side roads in Seamer Road, between its junctions with Grange Avenue and Oak Road, did not adequately inform drivers that they have entered the clearway.

Additional signs have now been ordered and enforcement on the roads has been suspended.

This admission could now open the floodgates for drivers to claim back fines that were issued when the illegal signs were in place.

Mr Hughes was thrilled with the outcome, which could mean that anybody who was issued a ticket on the Seamer Road Urban Clearway between January 2009 and August 2011, when the posting was in place, could have it rescinded.

Previously, Mr Hughes had spoken out to demand a review of several sections of roads in Scarborough he felt were illegally marked.

Shortly after that article was published contentious road markings in Avenue Road were repainted - a move which Mr Hughes claimed was an admission of guilt.

The story sparked a huge debate on the Evening News website, and Mr Hughes has thanked the paper for helping to bring the matter to light.

An 18-month inquiry found Scarborough Council guilty of maladministration in 2004 over on-street car parking rules and fines.

The inquiry was launched following a complaint from Mr Hughes after his daughter was fined £30 after parking in St Thomas Street.