Porn found on man’s computer at work

York Crown Court
York Crown Court
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WHEN a 64-year-old man’s work computer was accessed by a client it was found to contain serious pornographic videos, a court was told.

John Hoar, of Malton, worked at a York drug rehabilitation centre when, on August 27 last year, a female client was using his computer and, on opening a desktop icon, found one of the videos entitled “Little Miss T”.

Hoar’s reaction was to suggest that it should not be reported because he felt the office manager had “enough on her plate”.

However it was reported and an e-mail address, entitled “Squirty Flirty”, found on the computer led police to search Hoar’s Victoria Road address and to him resigning.

There, said Rob Galley, prosecuting at York Crown Court, officers found hundreds of other images including computer generated material and drawings depicting child pornography and adult pornography.

Hoar appeared before the court for sentencing, having previously admitted 29 charges of making and possessing pornographic material.

He was sentenced to nine months’ custody, suspended for two years, banned from accessing any computer or the internet for two years and placed under a Sexual Offenders Prevention Order, restricting his access to children, indefinitely.

Hoar was also placed under supervision for two years, ordered to take part in a sex offender treatment programme and placed on the Sex Offender Register for 10 years.

Passing sentence, Judge Colin Burn said that the order would mean that, even after the computer ban ended in two years, his ability to use them would be controlled indefinitely by software monitoring his usage.

The court heard that Hoar, who is involved in nudist activities, was found to have 1,000 pictures of naked children in connection with his interest, but also to have several hundred images and video of a pornographic nature.

Mr Galley said that some of the images were classed as “extreme pornography”.

Ruth Cranidge, mitigating, said that a sentence of immediate custody would mean that Hoar would be locked up for only a short time without the help and treatment which he recognised he needed.

Adding that it was accepted that a probation officer had classed Hoar as being at high risk of re-offending, Miss Cranidge said that that fact emphasised that he needed treatment rather than custody.

Judge Burn told Hoar that he of all people, given the line of work he had been involved in, should have been aware of the vulnerability of youngsters.

He said that whilst there where people like Hoar prepared to download images of this nature for their own gratification, there will be people around that will be prepared to abuse children in this manner in order to create them.