Statistics reveal crime patterns

Crime graph of 2011 broken down into different crimes. And below, crime graph of 2011 showing anti-social behaviour and all other crimes (the red line is anti-social behaviour)
Crime graph of 2011 broken down into different crimes. And below, crime graph of 2011 showing anti-social behaviour and all other crimes (the red line is anti-social behaviour)

A YEAR’S worth of crime data for Scarborough has been revealed, giving a rare insight into disorder on the town’s streets.

In 2011, more than 4,000 crimes took place and a further 5,300 reports of anti-social behaviour incidents were made in the town centre and its surrounding urban areas.

Crime graph of 2011 showing anti-social behaviour and all other crimes. And below, crime graph of 2011 broken down into different crimes

Crime graph of 2011 showing anti-social behaviour and all other crimes. And below, crime graph of 2011 broken down into different crimes

The month-by-month statistics, released under a Home Office crime mapping scheme, also show wide fluctuations in crime rates in Scarborough, depending on the time of year.

The summer months were the toughest for police, with more than 2,700 incidents reported over June, July and August. There were 1,140 crimes and 1,591 anti-social behaviour reports in the period.

Anti-social behaviour in particular rose significantly in the hot summer months, reaching a high of 547 incidents in July.

Tony Quinn, Scarborough’s safer neighbourhood inspector, said: “Clearly, the increase in population and better weather means that crime and anti-social behaviour does peak in the summer.

“We plan for this increase in a number of ways. For example we look to reduce abstractions for training and leave in the peak months and ask for extra support from specialist departments such as roads policing and the dog section.”

For the previous two summers, private security firm G4S has also provided Scarborough Police with staff and a specialist van to transport suspects and increase the time officers are able to patrol the streets.

Help is also drafted in at other busy times of the year. Agencies such as 4Youth, the Street Angels and the Youth Justice Service were on patrol with police on Mischief Night and Halloween.

December was the quietest month of 2011, with 296 crimes and 370 cases of anti-social behaviour despite the traditionally alcohol-fuelled Christmas party season and relatively mild weather. It compared with 367 crimes in December 2009 and 300 crimes last year.

Insp Quinn put the reduction down to the extra police patrols which were drafted onto the streets of Scarborough over Christmas.

Overall, he said, crime had fallen by 14 per cent compared to the same period last year, with 500 fewer so far being committed. The detection rate also remained well above the national average, with almost one in two crimes being detected in Scarborough.

Anti-social behaviour remained static, with falls in the north and south of the town countered by a rise in central areas which has been largely blamed on problems associated with street drinkers.

In St Nicholas Street, a crime and anti-social behaviour hot-spot, there were 512 incidents in 2011.

There were 304 crimes committed in September - 107 fewer than there had been in August. The types of crimes reported in Scarborough also varied wildly from month to month.

There was a spate of robberies in February, when seven were committed. A further six took place in July, including one in which a 45-year-old was attacked by two men in Albemarle Crescent and had his wallet taken.

But there was only one robbery in April and none at all in June. A knife-point robbery at the Co-op in Westwood Road in January was one of only two that month.

There was almost four times more vehicle crimes carried out in August compared to June, and of the 300 burglaries committed in Scarborough in 2011, only 13 came in September with 19 each in July and May.

The data is for the Scarborough safer neighbourhood area, which covers the town centre and outskirts of Scarborough. It does not include Eastfield, Cayton, Seamer or Burniston.