Drink drive message hits home with public

Rescue demo'Fire ,Ambulance,Police and NYCC Road Safety teams simulate a rescue from a crashed car to reinforce their christmas anti drink and drugs driving'campaign.'Picture by Neil Silk  125064'16/12/12
Rescue demo'Fire ,Ambulance,Police and NYCC Road Safety teams simulate a rescue from a crashed car to reinforce their christmas anti drink and drugs driving'campaign.'Picture by Neil Silk 125064'16/12/12
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Members of the emergency services staged a hard-hitting demonstration in Scarborough town centre about the devastating effects of drink driving.

Representatives from Scarborough’s ambulance, fire and rescue and police services joined forces with North Yorkshire County Council to hold the event outside M&S on Sunday.

Throughout the day there were four demonstrations of a simulated rescue from a vehicle involved in a road traffic collision, which had been caused by the driver being under the influence of alcohol.

It was designed to be as realistic as possible and was based around real drink-drive road traffic collisions that emergency services personnel have attended.

The demonstration involved firefighters using cutting equipment, paramedics attending to trauma patients and the police dealing with the “drunk driver”.

Jason Carlyon, clinical development manager from Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust, said: “Ambulance crews and our emergency service colleagues often see first-hand the devastating consequences and sometimes fatal injuries which occur as a result of careless decisions to drink and drive.

“We hope that this campaign will make people more aware of the dangers of drink and drug driving so that we reduce the number of such incidents happening.”

North Yorkshire firefighter Chris Spurden, who organised the multi-agency event, said: “Our intention is that the ‘don’t drink and drive’ message will hit home with local people and make them think very seriously about the consequences of drinking and getting behind the wheel. Drink and drug driving ruins lives.”

Community safety crew manager Rose Fearnley said the day had gone really well and that they had received a very positive response from the public.

She said: “It’s been really good. As soon as we got started, lots of people gathered round to watch.

“We’ve also been talking to people as they’ve been watching the demonstrations and given out safety advice.”

Crew members gave out leaflets and alcohol unit calculators to onlookers, advising people that there is no such thing as a “safe amount” to drink when driving.

The two main messages were to have a designated driver and not drive the morning after a night out drinking.