Pupils could get exam boost after county council challenge

File photo dated 02/03/12 of a pupil sitting an exam. The exams regulator will begin its investigation into GCSE gradings this week following claims that thousands of students have been treated unfairly. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Sunday August 26, 2012. Ofqual admitted there were "questions about how grade boundaries were set in a very small number of units across the year". See PA story POLITICS GCSE. Photo credit should read: David Davies/PA Wire
File photo dated 02/03/12 of a pupil sitting an exam. The exams regulator will begin its investigation into GCSE gradings this week following claims that thousands of students have been treated unfairly. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Sunday August 26, 2012. Ofqual admitted there were "questions about how grade boundaries were set in a very small number of units across the year". See PA story POLITICS GCSE. Photo credit should read: David Davies/PA Wire
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Pupils in Scarborough could have their GCSE results upgraded after it emerged that North Yorkshire County Council are set to challenge exam boards over their marking of the English exam, after a n unexpected slump in the pass rate.

The authority confirmed their decision to challenge the results after concerns that grade changes meant thousands of pupils missed out on achieving a C grade in the exam.

Potentially, the grade boundary shift could have a devastating affect on pupils.

Pupils need to achieve five or more A*-C grades in their exams to sit their A-levels, before possibly moving on to University.

A spokesman for North Yorkshire County Council said: “The council will work collectively with other authorities to challenge the exam boards over this summer’s marking of the English GCSE exam and the impact associated with the reported change in grade boundaries between January and June.”

The authorities decision to question the results comes after the first pass rate drop in 24 years, when the results were released last Thursday.

Examinations regulator Ofqual has promised to “look closely” at how grade bands were set following claims GCSE English papers were marked too harshly in an attempt to control grade inflation.

Education Secretary Michael Grove has come under fire over the “unfair” marking, and has been called upon to reorder the marking of the exams in question.

The exam storm centres around claims that pupils who sat GCSE English papers this summer were graded more harshly than those who took exams at a sitting in January.

Pupils sitting English exams in January required 44 per cent to achieve a C grade.

However, final exams in the summer required a mark of 53 per cent to receive the important grade.

This year, St Augustines lead the way in Scarborough, with 69 per cent of pupils receiving five A* - C grades - including maths and English.

Students at Scalby, Graham and Pindar were also celebrating after receiving top grades in the exams.