Scalby School celebrates 70 golden years

Bernard Sanderson, 81, one of the first pupils, returns to his old school, with his wife Grace, for Scalby School's 70th Anniversary party on Saturday, welcomed by present pupils Charlie Ward, left and Eleanor Wood. Bernard planted the grass at the front of the school, which is still there. Picture by Andrew Higgins 124158b 13/10/12
Bernard Sanderson, 81, one of the first pupils, returns to his old school, with his wife Grace, for Scalby School's 70th Anniversary party on Saturday, welcomed by present pupils Charlie Ward, left and Eleanor Wood. Bernard planted the grass at the front of the school, which is still there. Picture by Andrew Higgins 124158b 13/10/12
7
Have your say

Golden anniversary celebrations have united students past and present at Scalby School.

More than forty of the school’s first ever students travelled from around the country to celebrate Scalby’s 70 years.

Pupils put on a show for their guests, some of the schools original pupils, at Scalby School's 70th Anniversary party on Saturday. Picture by Andrew Higgins 124158e 13/10/12

Pupils put on a show for their guests, some of the schools original pupils, at Scalby School's 70th Anniversary party on Saturday. Picture by Andrew Higgins 124158e 13/10/12

The former pupils were entertained by current students and staff and an anniversary party on Saturday.

The day featured a 1940’s themed lunch of Woolton Pie or Beef Stew and Dumplings served with boiled potatoes and vegetables, followed by jam roly poly or apple fool.

Scalby’s original school log book and class register will be on display together with photographs and other artefacts from the 1940s.

Scalby headteacher David Reed said: “It has been a really special and memorable day. Some of the people here in this hall today were here in this very spot the first assembly of Scalby School in 1942.

“So for them to meet each other again after many years and get together to give us information about the school which has been buried in the past is absolutely fantastic. For example one lady here told me that the headmaster used to be called Doggy Hammond, but she couldn’t remember why.

“From Scalby’s point of view the highlight of the anniversary has been the opportunity for the students and the staff to meet these people that are part of the school’s story.”

Ruth Allan (nee Sanderson) was at Scalby School in 1944, and travelled Basingstoke to be part of the anniversary celebrations.

She said: “I remember my first day and being really intimidate by the size of the school. I’d never been to a school with corridors!

“My first teacher was Mrs Smith who was a needle work teacher, she was really very strict.

“Scalby School gave us all a really good grounding.”

Mrs Allen recalls there was no uniform at the time, and had brought with her several items made in needlework classes including a satchel for holding books, a hat and apron, and a blouse.

Ray Shannon, 79, of Newby, said: “Scalby School had been open around 18 months when I arrived. It was fantastic.

“I couldn’t believe it that the boys did needlework and cookery and the girls did wood work and metal work. It taught me life skills though and was very educational, and I’ve been able to sew on button a ever since.

“I have really enjoyed today. I have seen quite a few friends who I hadn’t seen for years and years, we have all been swapping stories.”

Current pupils Eleanor Wood, 12, and Jessica Cunningham, 13, described their highlights of the anniversary celebrations.

They said: “We really enjoyed interviewing all the people who came here. We learnt lots about the school and what it was like. They told us how the lawn wasn’t there before, and we met the person who lay it, and we learnt that the boys and girls used to be in separate classes for certain lessons.”

Scalby School opened its doors to 360 children on September 14, 1942 having cost £23,647 to build and £2,100 to furnish. It was officially opened Friday, September 18 by the president of the Royal Institute of British Architects W H Ansell.