School unveils plans to convert to an academy

George Pindar School is considering plans to convert to a self-governing academy . Picture Richard Ponter 132122b
George Pindar School is considering plans to convert to a self-governing academy . Picture Richard Ponter 132122b
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George Pindar School has revealed it is considering plans to convert to a self-governing academy.

It hopes the move will encourage more collaboration with other schools in the area in a bid to aid further development.

If the new status is granted, the Eastfield school would be the first mainstream school in Scarborough to make the conversion.

Headteacher John Senior said: “In this day and age schools need to collaborate and work closely with each other if they are to improve. A vital part of this process is working with a range of schools including those that are proven to be outstanding in order to improve your own practice.”

Academies are semi-independent schools run by a special trust and receive funding from the Government rather than the council.

Mr Senior said George Pindar was looking closely at the work of the School Partnership Trust, the fastest growing academy chain in the country.

“The process really began after an invitation from the trust’s chairman, Sir Paul Edwards, for myself and my deputy, James Pape, to meet with him to discuss what his academy chain could offer George Pindar School,” he said.

“It quickly emerged that Sir Paul shares our own values as a school, in particular having a range of traditional expectations of young people.

“Staff and governors will be involved in a range of fact finding visits and meetings to decide whether the trust is right for us.”

Academies have more freedom than other state schools over their finances, the curriculum, and teachers’ pay and conditions. There are currently only 10 in North Yorkshire.

Mr Senior said: “Regardless of any future decision, George Pindar will always be a North Yorkshire school. We will always wish to work with our existing partners in the county, clearly the local authority, but in particular our primary school partners, the other coastal secondary schools and any other school regionally who would like to share their existing practice and develop new initiatives for the future.”