Colder winters could be norm

Paul Hudson book signing at SEN.'Paul pictured with his new book.'114741a. Picture Kevin Allen.'24/11/11.
Paul Hudson book signing at SEN.'Paul pictured with his new book.'114741a. Picture Kevin Allen.'24/11/11.
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FORECASTS of the worst winter since records began are greatly exaggerated, according to one local weatherman.

Paul Hudson, who regularly presents Look North’s daily weather reports, was at the Evening News offices yesterday to sign copies of his latest book – Frozen Britain.

Paul Hudson book signing at SEN.'Paul signs a copy of his new book for Mary Lawrence.'114741b. Picture Kevin Allen.'24/11/11.

Paul Hudson book signing at SEN.'Paul signs a copy of his new book for Mary Lawrence.'114741b. Picture Kevin Allen.'24/11/11.

He said: “There’s been an awful lot of hype in the newspapers saying that it could be the worst on record but it’s not going to happen. It’s likely to be colder than average and I think there will be a few snow events but very unlikely to be as bad as last winter.”

His visit to Scarborough was the first signing event for the new book which is an updated version of Frozen In Time – which was first published in 2006 and co-written with Ian McCaskill.

He said: “We wanted to include the last three bad winters. December was the coldest since 1890 and that’s why we wanted to rewrite it.”

He added that since the last book certain things had happened which had caused people to look at the reasons why winters had become much colder. He said: “It’s likely to be unusual solar activity. And if that’s the impact over the last three years it could become more common.”

The weather expert said that terms such as global warming caused confusion, when the weather was colder than normal, and climate change was a more accurate description.

Damon Taylor, from Filey, was the first in the queue to get his copy signed. He said: “I like nature and all about the weather. I like the way he does the weather because he makes it interesting.”

Mary Lawrence, from Sandybed, said she was sending the book to relatives in Spain. She said: “They watch Paul every night. They are fans.”

Full of pictures, the book looks at the winters of 1947, 1962-63, 1978-79 – known as the winter of discontent because of the industrial unrest which coincided with the bad weather – as well as more recent winters.