Water boost for tourism

Scarborough's South Bay.'121202j
Scarborough's South Bay.'121202j

SCARBOROUGH’S tourist trade should reap a long-term boost from planned projects by Yorkshire Water, according to council officials and engineers.

Members of Scarborough Council’s Environment and Economy Scrutiny Committee were given a progress report on the various schemes including a massive new storage tank at the Toll House Pumping Station site.

Scarborough's south bay cuts a tranquil early-evening scene in this picture by Evening News photographer Dave Barry.

Scarborough's south bay cuts a tranquil early-evening scene in this picture by Evening News photographer Dave Barry.

They aim to help raise the quality of the area’s bathing water to comply with tough new European standards which are due be introduced in 2015.

Stewart Rowe, the council’s principal coastal officer, said Yorkshire Water was aiming to achieve the best water quality in Europe and an excellent quality rating was essential in retaining blue flag status for resort beaches – with improvement needed for the South Bay.

He added: “Tourism is our life blood. In the long-term if we get the bathing water quality right it does underline our tourism sector.”

As well as the storm water storage tank at the Toll House site the work will involve other projects including increased storage at Burniston Waste Water Treatment Works and new filtration equipment at Peasholm Gap.

Phil Press, the technical consultant for Yorkshire Water, told councillors that the new measures would mainly deal with excess surface water – typically during periods of heavy rainfall.

He added: “The Toll House is the one that is in the public eye. It should make sure we don’t have any trouble with backing up in the sewers when we have high tides and a big storm at the same time.”

Yorkshire Water hopes to get planning permission this week for a new building at the Toll House site but last week concerns were raised that the proposed structure was unimaginative.

Cllr Godfrey Allanson, the scrutiny committee chairman, said: “We have to live with it. I thought ‘what an ugly building and a plain building’. We weren’t happy with it at all.”

And Cllr Jane Mortimer agreed and said it looked “utilitarian”.