A new lease of life for hospital

Work at Scarborough Hospital'Work under way at the main entrance'Picture by Neil Silk  114934a
Work at Scarborough Hospital'Work under way at the main entrance'Picture by Neil Silk 114934a
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ONGOING building work and refurbishment is helping to give Scarborough Hospital a new lease of life.

The hospital has seen a number of developments in recent months which have started make a real change to how the site looks and feels for patients and staff.

Work at Scarborough Hospital'Refurbishment well under way in the radiology dept'Picture by Neil Silk  114934b'07/12/11

Work at Scarborough Hospital'Refurbishment well under way in the radiology dept'Picture by Neil Silk 114934b'07/12/11

Major investment has been ploughed in to bringing the buildings and facilities up to date, with £600,000 being spent on the reception area alone.

Facilities director James Hayward said he was delighted to see work progressing across the site and thanked patients for their co-operation.

One of the current “work in progress” areas is main reception, which has been temporarily relocated to the West Wing reception.

The new main reception is due to be completed by the end of January and will feature a new coffee shop, WRVS shop, waiting area, toilets, meeting room and cancer information point.

Mr Hayward explained that it will also feature an eco-friendly heating system, which will reuse excess heat generated in the hospital’s main computer room.

Work is also part-way through in the radiology department, having started in September.

A new mammography suite has been created for breast scans and the reception and changing areas are also being refurbished.

Mr Hayward said the whole project will be completed by Christmas.

Reaction from patients so far has been good. Sue Dickinson, of Bridlington, said: “It looks really good - I’m impressed with what I’ve seen.”

Work on the endoscopy unit is now complete and improvements have led to it becoming a fully accredited unit. New cleaning and disinfecting equipment has meant that the unit now runs much more efficiently.

Senior Sister Joan Ratcliffe explained: “Cleaning is a very big issue now, which is why we got the accreditation.”

Accident and emergency has also had a complete overhaul, with new cubicles, a revamped waiting area, assessment room and children’s room.

Heather Simpson, A&E administration co-ordinator, said: “It’s much bigger and has certainly made a difference to patients.

“People have been commenting on how nice it looks.”

A&E consultant Andy Volans added: “The rooms are more comfortable, airier and more spacious.

“Now its about learning how to make it work most optimally.”

Work is also soon to be completed on a new isolation suite in the intensive care unit, which is specifically for patients who are critically ill and susceptible to illness or infection.

It has cost £400,000 and will be finished by the end of next week.