DCSIMG

Confusion as hospital cancels follow-up scan

Nathan Smith has a cist on his brain but Scarborough Hospital has cancelled his follow-up MRI scan. Photo by Andrew Higgins.

Nathan Smith has a cist on his brain but Scarborough Hospital has cancelled his follow-up MRI scan. Photo by Andrew Higgins.

A man with a cyst on his brain who suffers up to four seizures a month has criticised Scarborough Hospital after a vital MRI scan was cancelled.

Nathan Smith, 29, of Colescliffe Road, claims he was told by doctors that he “didn’t warrant” the follow-up procedure despite the fact his condition was getting worse.

The Barrowcliff resident said he has now been left fearing for his life amid concerns the cyst might have grown.

He said: “I now have seizures three or four times a month. It has affected my life and I don’t go out of the house.

“I don’t really know what I can do if doctors have said no. I have already tried to get an MRI from other hospitals, but Scarborough had the earliest appointment.”

Mr Smith was returning from a football match in October 2011 when he had his first seizure. He was admitted to Scarborough Hospital for four days, where he was given an MRI and CT scan.

He was due to attend a follow-up appointment two weeks ago, but when he rang the hospital to double check, he was told there was no record.

“It has been over a year since I had the emergency MRI scan. The reason I was given was that I didn’t warrant one,” he said. “I still haven’t had a diagnosis. I haven’t even had a follow-up and the cyst could have grown.”

A spokesperson for York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, said: “While we cannot comment on individual patients, the decision as to whether a scan is given is based on clinical judgement. If Mr Smith has concerns about his treatment we would urge him to get in touch with the trust directly.”

Last week the Scarborough News revealed that a coroner is demanding the government takes action after it emerged that it was difficult to obtain full-body CT scans at the hospital.

A spokeperson said: “Access to emergency scans is governed entirely by clinical need and not cost.”

 

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