Information board for historic dovecote

The new plaque for Cloughton Hall Dovecote.Mayor Andrew Backhouse,with owners Geoff and Barbara Hill,Architect Andrew Boyce,Mayoress Sue Backhouse. Picture Richard Ponter 141902a
The new plaque for Cloughton Hall Dovecote.Mayor Andrew Backhouse,with owners Geoff and Barbara Hill,Architect Andrew Boyce,Mayoress Sue Backhouse. Picture Richard Ponter 141902a
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A plaque has been unveiled to celebrate the recent renovation of one of Scarborough’s oldest buildings.

The dovecote at Cloughton Hall, which dates back to the early 18th century, has undergone reconstruction work following structural collapse during the severe winter of 2010.

The historic building has also now been provided with an information plaque, which is located at the entrance to the Cloughton Hall site.

Scarborough-based graphic designer Mark Pickering, of Attune to Nature, was asked to produce the plaque, which informs visitors about the dovecotes origins and also about its recent renovation.

Mr Pickering said: “It was a really nice project to be involved in. I grew up in Burniston so to do something like this was great.

“I didn’t know there was a building so close by that went back to the medieval period.”

He added: “I took the inspiration for my design from the medieval era. It’s reflected in the illuminated characters and the typography.”

Cloughton Hall dovecote is a post medieval three tiered, circular, dome topped, stone structure, surmounted by a pitched roof timber access portal.

The date of the original building is uncertain, but archaeological opinion suggests that the current building was constructed in the early 18th century to provide a source of food for The Hall and fertiliser for the gardens.

The construction is of traditional masonry with an inner and outer skin and rubble corework.

The bonding material is mid-brown clay with gravel inclusions. The interior is of coursed rubble, formed into a beehive-shaped space, incorporating nest-holes above a rat-guard string course at 1.8m above a slabbed floor.

Manual access to the next-holes would have been by means of a timber rotating potence ladder, which no longer exists.

Following significant structural collapse during the severe winter of 2010, major reconstruction work was commissioned in 2013 by the owners of Cloughton Hall, Geoffrey and Barbara Hill. The main contractors were Matthias Garn and Partner under the direction of architect Andrew Boyce of Ferrey and Mennim Ltd.

Substantial financial assistance for the reconstruction was provided by English Heritage and the Country Houses Foundation. The interpretation board was funded by the Scarborough Rural Small Scale Enhancement Scheme.