Newly restored map now in place

Edward Bawden's 1931 map of Scarborough has been lovingly restored after the friends of the library raised the funds to have the work restored. Jan Bee Brown was on hand to officially unveil the map and is pictured with Bawden Project Leader Colin Langford. Also pictured are some of the many guests who turned up to witness the unveiling. 121519. Picture by Dave Kettlewell.'10/04/2012
Edward Bawden's 1931 map of Scarborough has been lovingly restored after the friends of the library raised the funds to have the work restored. Jan Bee Brown was on hand to officially unveil the map and is pictured with Bawden Project Leader Colin Langford. Also pictured are some of the many guests who turned up to witness the unveiling. 121519. Picture by Dave Kettlewell.'10/04/2012

NEWLY restored and framed, the Bawden Map is back on display in Scarborough Library.

The “forgotten treasure”, commissioned in 1931 by Scarborough hotelier Tom Laughton, now stands in the foyer to the concert room where it will be seen by thousands of people each year.

The project was masterminded by the Friends of Scarborough Library with members raising the £2,000 needed to restore the map to its former glory.

“This has been a long project,” said Friends member and project leader Colin Langford.

Scarborough-based designer and artist Jan Bee Brown unveiled the artwork yesterday.

Dozens of people gathered to watch the official unveiling and then attended a presentation in the concert room.

This included information on the map’s history from Helen Birmingham, of Belle Vue Parade Studio, and Rachel Greenwood from the North Yorkshire County Council conservation office.

“There is now a brighter future for the map which is a priceless treasure,” said Mrs Birmingham.

The Bawden Map was originally in the Pavilion Hotel, owned by the Laughton family, and moved to the entrance to the children’s library in 1961. It was removed earlier this year for work to be carried out.

It had suffered damp damage and had been attacked by silverfish – just some of the problems tackled by Rachel Greenwood in the restoration project.

It has now been placed in an oak frame with a perspex cover to protect it from sunlight.

“It really was a privilege to work on something so precious and colourful,” said Rachel.

The presentation concluded with announcements of the winners of poetry competitions run in conjuction with the restoration.

The contest was supervised by Scarborough poet Jo Reed Turner and judged by Katrina Portreous and Kate Boddy.

Adults: 1 Jestam by Anne Clarke; Scarborough Rocks, John Tunely; 3. Scarborough, Megan Burnside.

Children: 1. Sandcastle, Sam McNeill; 2. That’s Scarborough, George Walmsley; 3. Scarborough, Jack Sharp (all from Cayton School).

Among the first people to see the restored map will be Scarborough Literature Festival goers. The four-day event starts tomorrow.

l Festival details – page 21