Rugby club hopes not t’annoy the neighbours with a sound system

Scarborough R.U.F.C's home Silver Royd

Scarborough R.U.F.C's home Silver Royd

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Scarborough Rugby Club could get planning approval to use loudspeakers at a number of home games if the plan is given the green light today.

Scarborough Rugby Club could get planning approval to use loudspeakers at a number of home games if the plan is 
given the green light today.

When planning permission for the Silver Royd complex was granted in 2007 planners ruled that no functions or events should be held that involved amplified music or sound outside the clubhouse.

However, the club is hoping a resubmitted application - to use amplified sound at certain specified events - will be looked on more favourably by councillors.

The plan has attracted 373 representations in support compared with 166 in opposition.

In a report by Jill Low, Scarborough Council’s planning manager, she said written approval should be given to the club subject to conditions.

She added: “The approved events are first team home rugby games and representative rugby games such as county games and finals - up to but not exceeding 21 matches a year.”

The report also recommends the use of amplified sound on pitches two to five for rugby tournaments and festivals – not exceeding four events a year with each event lasting up to two consecutive days.

Mrs Low said: “The applicants have explained that the development at the club means that the size of crowd being generated now increases the need for amplified sound at the main events.

“Clear, efficient and reliable communications are an integral part of any safety management operation, regardless of the type of sports ground or event.

“A public address system usually provides the main form of communication between management and the spectators. There are also events, such as the festivals, where some amplified sound can enhance the overall enjoyment of the occasion.”

Steve Reynolds, the council’s environment and countryside manager, said: “In relation to locations 1 and 2 it is clear that the levels established, 53 dBa and 48 dBa respectively are adequate to keep the noise levels both externally and internally at nearby properties below the stringent requirements of the World Health Organisation guidance.

“Any noise exceeding the level during the 15-minute period would necessitate a reduction in noise during the same period to ensure that the overall equivalent noise level cannot exceed 53 dBa or 48 dBa depending on which location is used.”

Scarborough Council will discuss the case on Thursday June 14 at 1pm.