Spider glass could halt deadly wall

End elevation of The Sands showing the impact marks left by geese striking the building. Special lights fitted to the building to help prevent bird strikes are visible on the roof.'120848c. Picture Kevin Allen.'23/02/12.
End elevation of The Sands showing the impact marks left by geese striking the building. Special lights fitted to the building to help prevent bird strikes are visible on the roof.'120848c. Picture Kevin Allen.'23/02/12.
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A new type of glass, inspired by the web of a spider, could help put an end to Scarborough’s infamous ‘Wall of Death’.

A German scientist has developed the hi-tech Ornilux glass, which reflects ultraviolet light, which can be seen by birds to stop them flying into buildings and killing themselves.

It could be the solution to the problematic white wall on the North Bay Sands development.

In March this week, The Scarborough Evening News highlighted the harrowing death of a Canadian Goose, which was found dead after it flew into the wall.

Another goose had to be put down after it was discovered with a broken neck.

It was believed the geese were mistaking the grey wall for the sky.

The grim discovery was one of a number of reports of geese either maimed or killed after flying into the side of the property.

But the new technology could possibly be used as a way to halt the bird deaths.

The glass has a web of lines coated on to its surface, which are invisible to the human eye.

The glass is based on the web of the common orb weaver spider.

Currently, the cost is around 50 per cent more expensive that normal glass, and it has already been installed in the lookout tower and visitors’ centre on Holy Island, in Lindisfarne, Northumberland.

The story caused outrage when it was initially published in March, and hundreds of suggestions were made as to how the developers, Benchmark, could stop the problem.

A local graffiti artist offered to paint a mural on the side of the wall.

Another suggested solution was that a woodland scene be painted onto the side, to stop the confusion among the birds.

One person even suggested acquiring the services of iconic artist David Hockney to help brighten up the wall.

Estimates show that, in Europe, every year 250 million birds are killed after flying into buildings.