Taking the driving seat for a mock rescue - Watch the video

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FIRE crews joined forces with ambulance service workers to take part in a realistic training exercise in Scarborough.

FIRE crews joined forces with ambulance service workers to take part in a realistic training exercise in Scarborough.

Reporter Susan Stephenson becomes the casualty as part of a joint fire service and ambulance service exercise..'Picture by Neil Silk  113103a

Reporter Susan Stephenson becomes the casualty as part of a joint fire service and ambulance service exercise..'Picture by Neil Silk 113103a

The mock-up rescue from a crashed car took place in the fire station yard and was part of an ongoing programme of training.

The situation involved cutting a live casualty free from a Rover 414, which had crashed into the side of another car, lifting them free on a spinal board and getting them safely into a waiting ambulance.

Andy Blades, station manager for Ryedale District, said: “Today’s activity will provide firefighters and paramedics from North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service and Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust with an opportunity to develop the already effective partnership.

“The realistic training scenario has been designed to enhance efficiency in terms of how this type of incident is resolved, ensuring the best care for the people that we serve.”

Reporter Susan Stephenson becomes the casualty as part of a joint fire service and ambulance service exercise..'Picture by Neil Silk  113103a

Reporter Susan Stephenson becomes the casualty as part of a joint fire service and ambulance service exercise..'Picture by Neil Silk 113103a

Jason Carlyon, an emergency care practitioner for Yorkshire Ambulance Service, said: “Multi-agency exercises like this one offer us a real opportunity to work together with our emergency service colleagues to reassure us that the things we have practised separately will work when we’re operating side by side.”

The exercise took around 45 minutes and involved reporter Susan Stephenson being cut out of a car and lifted out of the wreckage on a spinal board.

All those involved were pleased with the session and said it had been a great success.

Mal Norris, watch manager for Green Watch, said: “It went really well. It’s the second training exercise we’ve done with the ambulance service and it’s definitely beneficial.

“Everyone gets something out of it and I hope it’s something we can build on in the future.”

Mr Carlyon, of the ambulance service, added: “From our point of view it was a success. We’re planning to do more in the future and take it beyond a single-vehicle situation to a bigger accident.

“It’s also excellent to have a live casualty as it makes it much more realistic.”