Tesco road closure row heats up

Scarborough Town Against Tesco Store (STATS) chairman Malcolm Short (left) and Neil Price deliver the letters of objection to the Department of Transport officer in Newcastle.
Scarborough Town Against Tesco Store (STATS) chairman Malcolm Short (left) and Neil Price deliver the letters of objection to the Department of Transport officer in Newcastle.

Campaigners against Scarborough’s multi-million pound Tesco superstore have handed in letters containing more than 6,000 signatures to the Government.

It comes following the launch of a public consultation over a crucial road closure which has stalled the construction of the Dean Road development.

The supermarket giant is hoping the Department for Transport (DfT) will grant permission to partially close Trafalgar Street West so work can finally begin.

Scarborough Town Against Tesco Store (STATS) has been encouraging people to oppose the scheme.

Last week the group delivered 6,283 individually signed letters of objection to the DfT office in Newcastle following a number of public meetings and collecting sessions.

The group’s chairman, Malcolm Short, said: “There has been no problem getting people to sign, in fact it has been the opposite in that people have been coming up to us to ask us how to object to this and we have helped them in the process. The result of which was to achieve a large number of the letters and it is important to point out that over 6,200 of these are from local Scarborough people.”

Mr Short said the letters will be passed on to Tesco which then has decide on the next move.

He said: “What has been made clear to us is that it is now up to Tesco to consult with the objectors and attempt to resolve the issues. If this cannot be done then Tesco will have to go back to the DfT and tell them this, it would then most likely have to go to a public inquiry.”

The Government consultation, which ended last Wednesday, allowed residents 28 days to comment on the proposals, which will see part of the street closed off and traffic re-routed onto adjoining main roads.

Mr Short added: “The large number of individual letters shows the local feeling on the road closure, and I believe that this is the largest number of individual objection letters presented for any local issue.”

The controversial development was passed by just a single vote in December 2011 by Scarborough Council’s planning committee.