Concerns over station revamp

Pedestrians face a hazard reaching the station now that the lines have been removed.
Pedestrians face a hazard reaching the station now that the lines have been removed.

WORRIED passengers have branded the removal of yellow lines from a pedestrian crossing at Scarborough Railway Station as “dangerous”.

They have said that the move could put commuters in danger of being hit by taxis as they blindly turn on to the station forecourt.

Views of Scarborough Railway Station forecourt .120241d Picture Richard Ponter.

Views of Scarborough Railway Station forecourt .120241d Picture Richard Ponter.

Linda Sefton was at the station to take her grandson, Nathan, five, for a spot of train watching.

She raised concerns for his safety, saying: “It’s dangerous, and we have to be very careful now when crossing.

“They should put them back, definitely. I sometimes have two children with me, and you have to be alert if you have little ones as the taxis can swing around the corner very quickly.”

Scarborough pensioners Anne Holmes and Barbara Jocelyn have also called for the markings to be reinstated.

Taxis queuing at the station forecourt.. pedestrians face a hazard reaching the station now that the lines have been removed.

Taxis queuing at the station forecourt.. pedestrians face a hazard reaching the station now that the lines have been removed.

Anne, 65, said: “I don’t like it at all, I think it’s disgusting.

“It doesn’t look safe to me and it’s dangerous.”

Barbara, also 65, added: “It’s a bit dangerous and scary for people at my age.

“It needs to get sorted quickly.”

The Evening News attempted to contact First TransPennine, which operates the trains to and from Scarborough, to see why the markings have been removed, but we received no comment.

Meanwhile, concerns have also been raised over changes to the forecourt of Scarborough’s railway station.

Taxi drivers now have fewer spaces to wait on the rank outside the station and a zebra crossing has been removed as part of recent changes to the layout.

When the Evening News approached bosses of companies whose drivers use the rank they said there would be no official comment on the recent changes.

It is understood that available spaces have been cut by around half – with overflow drivers having to use a nearby rank across the road in Northway – while fees charged to drivers have risen by around 25 per cent to just under £500.

One taxi driver, who would not give his name, said: “It’s not so bad now but in the summer, when it’s busier, passengers will suffer.”

Dan Taylor, a 19-year-old university student from Barwick Street, said that cars having to cross two busy lanes of traffic was quite hazardous “if people wanted to get a taxi relatively quickly”.