‘Wall of death’ action at last

133915b'NC Plastering lts of Whitby prepare the wall at the Sands for a finishing top coat of paint to try and prevent geese from flying into it'Picture by Neil Silk'25/09/13
133915b'NC Plastering lts of Whitby prepare the wall at the Sands for a finishing top coat of paint to try and prevent geese from flying into it'Picture by Neil Silk'25/09/13

The saga over the infamous ‘Wall of Death’ which has claimed the lives of countless geese may have finally come to an end.

Contractors have painted the end wall of Kepwick House at The Sands development in North Bay a deep red in the hope of stopping the birds from flying into it.

It is hoped it will bring to an end a problem that has rumbled on for close to four years and which prompted more than 500 people to sign a Save the Geese petition in the Scarborough News.

The rusty red colour has been chosen after consultation with bird experts as it will, in theory, create a contrast with the sky so the geese know to avoid the wall and put a stop to the carnage.

Richard Dean, of Escape2 Events Management Ltd, promised earlier this year he would act to end the problem and said he was glad that it could finally be put to bed.

He said: “We hope that this will stop the issue, it is no guarantee but we think this is the best option.”

Geese had been slamming into the pale coloured wall with sickening regularity, breaking their necks and leaving the side of the building peppered with large indentations.

Lights had been attached to the roof of the apartments, which were completed in 2008, to try and act as a warning to the birds but this proved ineffective and birds kept dying.

Other ideas put forward included painting stripes onto the building and one local artist even offered to create a giant woodland mural so the geese would believe they were flying towards trees and take evasive action as they head out to the North Sea.

Scarborough resident Julia Stephenson was walking past the wall as it was being painted.

She said: “It certainly seems bright enough, hopefully it will stop all those geese dying.”

Holidaymaker Ian Griffin, from Halifax, was also watching the painting in progress.

“I wondered what they were up to,” he said, “I can see why the geese would be flying into it. If this puts a stop to the deaths then good on them I say.”

The painting could not have come at a better time as October is the time when the majority of the birds start their Autumn migration.