Daniel Gregory’s Column - How long before King Kenny is forced from the throne

Liverpool manager Kenny Dalglish before the Barclays Premier League match at the Sports Direct Arena, Newcastle. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday April 1, 2012. See PA story SOCCER Newcastle. Photo credit should read: Owen Humphreys/PA Wire. RESTRICTIONS: Editorial use only. Maximum 45 images during a match. No video emulation or promotion as 'live'. No use in games, competitions, merchandise, betting or single club/player services. No use with unofficial audio, video, data, fixtures or club/league logos.
Liverpool manager Kenny Dalglish before the Barclays Premier League match at the Sports Direct Arena, Newcastle. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday April 1, 2012. See PA story SOCCER Newcastle. Photo credit should read: Owen Humphreys/PA Wire. RESTRICTIONS: Editorial use only. Maximum 45 images during a match. No video emulation or promotion as 'live'. No use in games, competitions, merchandise, betting or single club/player services. No use with unofficial audio, video, data, fixtures or club/league logos.

WHAT an absolute embarrassment Liverpool were at St James’ Park on Sunday.

A team totally devoid of discipline, who apart from a bright opening 10 minutes or so, never looked like troubling Newcastle.

Millions upon millions have been ploughed into the squad since ‘king’ Kenny Dalglish took over from Roy Hodgson with the club in a so-called crisis, yet if you look at the statistics, the man who was tasked with saving the club hasn’t fared much better than his predecessor, spending more money in the process.

So is he only still in the hot seat because he is an Anfield legend of yesteryear? Yes is the simple answer, in my opinion.

From Hodgson’s brief tenure in charge at Anfield, he recorded 13 wins, nine draws and nine defeats from his 31 games. A win percentage of 41.93 per cent.

Dalglish, who has invested heavily in his squad in a bid to push Liverpool into the Champions League places, has won 31, drawn 16 and lost 18 of his games to date, representing a marginally improved win percentage of 47.69 per cent.

Since I started writing this column I have harped on and on about a lack of loyalty - I don’t like to see managers getting sacked before they are given the chance to turn things around.

Mick McCarthy, Andre Villas-Boas and Neil Warnock’s sackings recently are a perfect example of a total and utter lack of patience emanating from the modern game.

But Liverpool are eighth in the league table, behind Everton of all clubs, and if they dip any lower in the table they would be enduring their worst league placing for 50 years.

Dalglish has overseen a run of 10 games that have yielded just seven points, six points fewer than Hodgson accrued before he was given the boot.

On top of Liverpool’s form issues, Dalglish’s marquee signings have near enough all been huge failures to date for one reason or another.

The glaring one is Andy Carroll, £35million was about £25million too much and he has been the biggest transfer flop I can ever remember.

He clearly lost his balance and fell over after rounding Tim Krul - it’s probably less embarrassing to say it was a dive.

Then you have the £20million ploughed on Stewart Downing, the £16million on Jordan Henderson and the £22.5million on Luis Suarez - possibly the most disliked character in the history of the Premier League.

Yes, Henderson is young and still learning his trade, and Suarez has impressed at times, but both have proved poor signings in their own right.

Henderson was overpriced and could yet turn out to be mediocre, while Suarez must have had Liverpool’s public relations team working constant overtime for the past year or so.

Hodgson did have his moments of madness to be fair, and Dalglish could still win a cup double and finish seventh, but for all the money he’s spent, he hasn’t improved Liverpool. They are more of a unit, but they don’t look like challenging for Europe, let alone a Champions League spot. Surely the clock is ticking?