Daniel Gregory’s column: Time to end the vile chanting

Hopefully the show of solidarity at Goodison Park on Monday night will finally help to put and end to the vile chanting that goes on at some football matches. Share your thoughts. Tweet me @mrdanielgregory
Hopefully the show of solidarity at Goodison Park on Monday night will finally help to put and end to the vile chanting that goes on at some football matches. Share your thoughts. Tweet me @mrdanielgregory

A lot has been written and said about the overturning of the verdict handed out following the Hillsborough disaster in 1989 over the last week or so.

Coming from a different angle, the show of solidarity between the two Merseyside clubs following the minute’s tribute to the 96 who lost their lives is a fantastic platform to build upon for the rest of the game.

Far too often at football matches you’ll hear absolutely disgusting chants sang by a minority of fans.

The most notorious cases that spring to mind are the chants aimed at Liverpool for Hillsbrough, at Man United for the Munich air disaster in the 1960s and the two Leeds United fans who were stabbed to death in Istanbul shortly before their 2-0 loss against Galatasaray.

What kind of sick person sings songs about people dying in tragic circumstances?

Surely fans of other sports must just look on in disgust at football fans.

Sunday Supplement with Brian Woolnough and Journalists'Black - Matt Lawton, Mail'Light - Martin Lipton, Mirror'Stripes - Shaun Custis, Sun

Sunday Supplement with Brian Woolnough and Journalists'Black - Matt Lawton, Mail'Light - Martin Lipton, Mirror'Stripes - Shaun Custis, Sun

How often do you hear chanting like that at a cricket or rugby match? Very, very rarely, if ever.

This is a superb chance to clean up the terraces and I hope that club’s fans will follow the example set by Everton and Liverpool on Monday night.

Yes, there is nothing better than a blood-and-thunder derby match, and fans don’t have to hold hands with each other, far from it, but what is there to cheer about people who just love football dying?

One of the journalists I looked up to and respected when I was younger sadly died this week.

Brian Woolnough was a superb sports journalist, so good in fact that The Daily Star paid him £200,000 a year to lure him from The Sun in 2001.

It is very rare that you find a journalist who is so widely respected and liked in sport these days with the rolling 24-hour coverage and heightened scrutiny placed upon sports men and women now.

But since Woolnough’s passing on Tuesday, several prominent sporting personalities, including Sir Alex Ferguson and Sepp Blatter, have sung his praises.

Woolnough presented Hold The Back Page from 1994 before hosting the show under its new guise of The Sunday Supplement.

He was clearly widely revered among his peers and within the game of football and his death is a loss to the sports journalism industry.