Construction theory

Sculptor Andrew Pert, whose work is part of the Lines Of Conflict exhibition at Scarborough Art Gallery. Photo by Andrew Higgins 124629c 15/11/12
Sculptor Andrew Pert, whose work is part of the Lines Of Conflict exhibition at Scarborough Art Gallery. Photo by Andrew Higgins 124629c 15/11/12
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Soldiers in a row, a wire horse and a boat firing missiles at Scarborough Castle – are some of the sculptures on show at the art gallery.

There are also fabric-covered shells, a wind swept Yorkshire landscape and a bronze man walking his dog in the space in The Crescent.

Work by sculptor Andrew Pert, in the Lines Of Conflict exhibition at Scarborough Art Gallery. Photo by Andrew Higgins 124629e    15/11/12

Work by sculptor Andrew Pert, in the Lines Of Conflict exhibition at Scarborough Art Gallery. Photo by Andrew Higgins 124629e 15/11/12

All are inspired by the Bombardment of Scarborough in 1914 and are displayed under the banner Lines Of Conflict.

“Some sculptors have taken a more liberal approach to the theme,” said Andrew Pert, a Scarborough-based sculptor and retired architect.

He has four pieces on show as part of the exhibition by 14 members of the Yorkshire Sculptors Group.

They are Lines of Battle 1 and 2 – one is a row of helmeted warriors all with a distinctive character and the other is a line of more futuristic fighters.

Conflict is also an arrangement of soldiers and the final piece consists of two soldiers made of metal and whelk shells. Andrew’s sculptures are made from various metals, including lead, copper, zinc and aluminium.

He calls his method construction and works with whatever comes to hand – like the Burning Bush which is partly created from out of date electric wire made from braided copper.

“When people think of sculpture they think of Henry Moore but not that many people chip away at stone or carve wood any more.” Like his great grandfather and grandfather before him Andrew trained as an architect and sees the sculpture as complementary to that. He came to Scarborough to work for the council in 1982. After four years he went to work for the York diocese and was responisble for 550 vicarages. “My grandmother wanted me to be an architect and I conceded but insisted I wouldn’t be an eclesiastical one – but there you are,” he said.