Hockney exhibition drew record numbers

Andrew Clay, director of the Woodend Creative Workspace, welcomes the exhibition of early David Hockney work, to the Woodend gallery. Picture by Andrew Higgins   sn123143c     02/08/12

Andrew Clay, director of the Woodend Creative Workspace, welcomes the exhibition of early David Hockney work, to the Woodend gallery. Picture by Andrew Higgins sn123143c 02/08/12

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The David Hockney exhibition at Woodend was a roaring success with record numbers of visitors flooding through the doors.

The exhibtion was of the Bridlington-based artist’s etchings from the 1960s and 70s.

Andrew Clay, director of Woodend in the Crescent, said:

“We were honoured and delighted to be involved in such a prestigious exhibition.

“We’ve completed the visitor count and it is 3,500 for August, which is excellent news for Woodend.

“We sold 22 etchings, all the catalogues, plus a substantial amount of work by our existing artists so the knock-on effect has been very beneficial and we feel that this exhibition has really helped put the Gallery at Woodend on the map.”

The David Chalmers event that we have on at the moment is also quite a delight. Carrying on the Yorkshire theme, David has photographed a series of tree photographs based on the forests of the North York Moors National Park.

The exhibition forms part of the Celebrating Place project run by Chrysalis Arts. The charcoal used in the prints is also locally sourced. David manufactured his own materials using a formula of Indian ink and ground charcoal dust, which has been supplied by a local charcoal maker working in the same forests that David was photographing.

“Our next exhibition, following on from David Chalmers, will be Henri Matisse, another exhibition from the Goldmark Gallery,” sadi Andrew.

The collection will include Ronsard’s Florilége des Amours one of his most complicated and successful printmaking projects.

Henri Matisse (1869-1954) was undoubtedly one of the foremost painters of the first half of the 20th Century. He was the supreme master in those trends of 20th Century art that are represented by calligraphic pattern and the abstract use of pure colour.

Andrew Clay said: “In addition to the success of the gallery, the meeting rooms are booked up with interesting events, workshops, talks and seminars, there is a real buzz about the place.”