Nostalgia

Nostalgia
Dicky Dickinson, first governor of Scarborough spa.

Scarborough ‘spaw’: The early years

Why was there such a long delay between Mrs Thomasin Farrer’s “discovery” of the spa spring in the 1620s and Dr Robert Wittie’s printed promotion of it in the 1660s? If the doctor’s propaganda was historically accurate and news of the medicinal properties of Scarborough’s mineral water gradually spread from the town, to the Ridings and, by 1660, to the nation at large, then the same question remains unanswered: why did it take so long?

Lifestyle
Farm labourer wins compensation case

Farm labourer wins compensation case

At the Scarborough County Court John Thomas Walker, farm labourer, Staxton, claimed compensation from Watson Garbutt, Seamer, threshing machine proprietor, and George Lawson, farmer, Sherburn, under the Workmen’s Compensation Act.

Lifestyle
The point at which the spring water appears below Scarborough Spa.

Dr Wittie’s Water-Works

Bible-reading Christians had plenty of reasons for their fear of the sea: Old Testament references to it were negative and ominous. In Genesis, the waters were “the great abyss” out of which God created the solid, safe and fruitful land. The Garden of Eden had a river, but no sea; and the great flood, which drowned the earth and everything on it, was an instrument of God’s punishment of his people. In its unfathomable, dark depths, the sea harboured huge monsters such as the whale which swallowed disobedient Jonah.

Lifestyle
Farrer's Bar and Brasserie, Scarborough Spa. The bar is named in honour of Mrs Thomasin Farrer, who discovered the Spa waters.

How Scarborough became the first seaside spa

The popular, received view of the Restoration of 1660, which restored monarchy, the established church of England, and the House of Lords, is that immediately it also ushered in a time of unrestrained self-indulgence. Pleasure-seeking and pleasure-making became not only fashionable, their public legality was restored. Where previously there had been “Saints”, now there were rakes. Not just king, bishops and peers came back, but so did maypoles, theatres, bear- and bull-baiting and social license. By parading his mistresses and bastards, Charles II provided his kingdoms with a permissive role-model as far removed from Cromwell and his “Saints” as it could be. The king’s illegitimate offspring included an earl and six dukes.

Lifestyle
Boy steals 42 pairs of stockings to buy sweets

Boy steals 42 pairs of stockings to buy sweets

At the Scarborough Children’s Court before Mr George Rowntree (in the chair), Alderman Ascough, Mr W Saynor and Mr Servington Savery, a twelve-year-old boy was charged with breaking into 118 North Marine Road on the 28th May and stealing 42 pairs of old stockings and six jars value 4s, the property of Mary Melton and he was further charged with stealing a quantity of coal value 5s, the property of Edith Elvidge, Royal Avenue, between the 6th and 18th of May. He pleaded guilty to both charges.

Lifestyle
Scarborough's St Mary's Church and South Bay from a painting attributed to Francis Nicholson. The painting shows the rebuilt tower.

Nostalgia: Rebuilding of St Mary’s was beyond resources of the town

After the Restoration of 1660, Scarborough’s oldest, finest and now only place of religious worship was not restored. Running from 1649 onwards, St Mary’s churchwardens’ accounts show how the repair and rebuilding works of the town’s parish church were slow, piecemeal and ultimately quite beyond the resources of a diminished population to complete.

Lifestyle
A view of Clarence Gardens, North Bay, formerly known as Tintinholmes. A plague 'pesthouse' once stood in this area outside the town's residential boundary.

Nostalgia: Shattered Scarborough

If a veteran of Henry Cholmley’s Bluecoats (who had disgraced themselves on the battlefield of Edgehill in 1642) finally returned home after an absence of 18 years, he would have found his 
native town almost unrecognisable.

Nostalgia
Helmsley castle had been surrendered to Sir Thomas Fairfax in 1644 by Sir Jordan Crosland.

Nostalgia: Royalists rise from the ashes

As elsewhere in the country, in Scarborough the transition from republic back to monarchy happened gradually, not immediately, and initially without bloodshed. Captain Northend, commander of the castle garrison, offered no resistance: even as late as Michaelmas 1660, after Charles II had been welcomed back to London four months earlier, the majority of the re-elected members of the Common Hall on Sandside were burgesses who had sat there throughout the 1650s; and neither of the two Bailiffs, William Saunders and William Lawson, had Royalist records. On the contrary, both had prospered under the Commonwealth and Protectorate, Saunders as a woollen draper and wine licensee, who had been Bailiff in 1649 and 1654; and Lawson (no relation of the Admiral), who had the other vintner’s licence and a Sandside tavern.

Lifestyle
1918 Court: Trouble spreading over sales of butter

1918 Court: Trouble spreading over sales of butter

At the Scarborough Police Court Hannah Hepples, farmer’s wife, Allandale Farm, Hutton Buscel, was summoned for selling by retail, butter to a person who was not duly registered with her as a customer contrary to the Food Control Committee (Local Distribution) Order, 1917, on 6th June.

Nostalgia
Load more