Nostalgia

Nostalgia

Nostalgia: Paddling on Scarborough’s south beach

A moment in time captured by the photographer as a young girl is caught moving into the frame as Edwardian ladies and gents take their children for a paddle in Scarborough’s South Bay.

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'Bread or Blood' riots in London, 1816.

Nostalgia: Riot and bloody rebellion

When Jane Austen died at Winchester on July 18, 1817, her homeland seemed to be on the cliff edge of violent revolution. Yet, however much you might enjoy and admire Jane’s writing skill and subtle satire, in none of her novels is there a hint of the popular disturbances and widespread extreme distress that characterise the last years of her life. For most of her contemporaries, Regency England was a long way from the tranquil country depicted in Pride and Prejudice or Northanger Abbey.

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1918 court: Cinema’s lack of exits stalls licence renewal

1918 court: Cinema’s lack of exits stalls licence renewal

At the Scarborough Police Court today Mr Tasker Hart applied for a cinematograph licence for the Picturedrome in Newborough Street, refused at the Brewster Sessions.

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Nostalgia: South Bay winter scene

Nostalgia: South Bay winter scene

A heavy blanket of snow covers Scarborough’s South Bay and castle headland in this wintry scene taken in the early years of the last century.

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Painting shows the last-ever Frost Fair on the River Thames in 1814.

Nostalgia: Age of tempestuous winters

Usually ignored by historians, even when it seriously affected many more people in the past than it does nowadays, was the critical factor of weather. Between about 1790 and about 1830 Scarborough and the north-east coast and country seem to have suffered exceptional extremes. In the letters, diaries, official reports, newspapers and autobiographies written during these years there are innumerable references to severe winters of prolonged low temperatures and heavy falls of snow; days of torrential rain; and frequent gales, so strong that they were sometimes called “whirlwinds”. Living through these tempestuous times you could be forgiven for believing that another ice age was on its way.

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1918 court: An army cook’s slippery sale of surplus dripping

1918 court: An army cook’s slippery sale of surplus dripping

At the Scarborough Police Court, Hannah Elizabeth Hannard appeared on two summonses charging her with unlawfully buying certain regimental stores, viz 35¼lb and 42lbs of dripping, on February 7th and February 13th respectively, contrary to section 156 of the Army Act, 1881.

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Nostalgia: Clarence Gardens, North Bay, Scarborough

Nostalgia: Clarence Gardens, North Bay, Scarborough

Disappearing into the distance towards the Clifton hotel is the magnificent network of paths on the undercliff in North Bay known as Clarence Gardens.

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Lord's cricket ground  'the home of English cricket. Even the civilised sport of cricket has seen many brutal encounters between England and countries like Australia and the West Indies.

Nostalgia: Brutal sporting pastimes

Outdoor sports and games in Regency England ranged from the sedate and civilised to the brutal and barbarous. The baiting of animals for sport was not outlawed until 1835 and Stamford’s violent bull-running was not banned until four years later. During the French wars, bear-baiting with dogs had ceased in England, but only because of the lack of bears from the Continent, and the baiting of dogs, bulls and badgers and cock-fighting continued legally without interruption.

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1918 court: Troubled girl sent to workhouse for thefts

1918 court: Troubled girl sent to workhouse for thefts

A case came before Mr George Rowntree and other magistrates at the Scarborough Police Court. Gertrude Maw (19), domestic servant, Cayton, near Scarborough was charged with having stolen a treasury note of the value of 10s, the property of Susan Fawcett, on January 7th, and further with having stolen a wrist watch and strap, valued at 21s, the property of John Henry Swift, on January 7th.

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Nostalgia: Cliff Bridge toll booths

Nostalgia: Cliff Bridge toll booths

The Grand Hotel on St Nicholas Cliff and Cliff Bridge toll booths in the foreground.

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The Library, one of 21 etchings from James Green's Poetical Sketches. Its subject most probably belonged to Mr Ainsworth, known to have had the largest stock of books at that time in Scarborough.

Nostalgia: Rest and recreational reading

Having tired themselves out on one of Hinderwell’s recommended excursions into Scarborough’s rural hinterland, “the company” might now rest with a few days of recreational reading.

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1918 court: Youth summoned for not holding his horse

1918 court: Youth summoned for not holding his horse

At the Scarborough Police Court today, before Mr J Dippie (in the chair), Mr AW Sinclair, Mr AH Robinson, HJE Marsden and EH Dennis, a well-built youth, of fifteen was summoned for having a horse and van unattended in St Thomas Street, on the night of December 22nd.

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Nostalgia: South Bay

Nostalgia: South Bay

A view looking south towards Holbeck and Cayton Bay before the building of the South Bay bathing pool and promenade.

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A copy of Sir George Cayley's airship design.

Nostalgia: The genius of Sir George Cayley

There are two different kinds of villages or townships running along both sides of the eastern end of the Vale of Pickering, the “closed” estate villages which have belonged to one family generation after generation and the “open” ones of multi-ownership. Even today, the estate townships such as Hackness, Seamer, Ganton, Wykeham and West Heslerton contrast markedly with villages such as Snainton, Sherburn or Muston. The Cayleys no longer live in Brompton, the Legards have moved out from Ganton to Scampston, and Seamer no longer belongs to the Denisons, whereas Hackness has still the Johnstones and Wykeham the Dawnays. Yet, despite the relatively recent departure of the Cayleys, Brompton still bears the imprint of their presence during three centuries.

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1918 court: It’s game up for man caught with pheasant

1918 court: It’s game up for man caught with pheasant

Three cases were down for hearing against John Ward, waggoner, Osborne Lodge, East Ayton.

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Nostalgia: Warwick’s Tower

Nostalgia: Warwick’s Tower

Between 1898 and 1907, a tall, rotating, observation tower stood on Scarborough’s North Cliff and was known as Warwick’s Tower.

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The bridge which connects East and West Ayton was the work of John Carr of York, the most distinguished architect of the East and North Ridings at the time.

Nostalgia: Exploring the countryside

After a day-out, sampling the delights of “the romantic village” of Hackness, Thomas Hinderwell suggested that his readers next take the turnpike westwards from Scarborough as far as Snainton, where it branched off the road to Pickering.

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1918 court: Woman obtains goods under false pretences

1918 court: Woman obtains goods under false pretences

Clara Parnaby (otherwise Norah Morgan) was charged on remand at the Scarborough Police Court with having given false information to a lodging house keeper, at 5 Carlton Terrace, on January 19th, with a similar offence at Southlands, West Street, on January 7th, and with having obtained by false pretences between the 7th and 16th January from Messrs W Rowntree and Sons, a brown coat dress, and a pair of brown shoes valued altogether at £19 11s 7d.

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Nostalgia: Ship wrecks in South Bay

Nostalgia: Ship wrecks in South Bay

Aftermath of the great storm of October 1880 as broken and battered ships litter the south bay.

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1918 Court: Woman breaks petrol order with trip to town

1918 Court: Woman breaks petrol order with trip to town

Helen Mary Wrigley, of Ganton Hall, was summoned at the Scarborough Police Court on Wednesday, for having contravened the Motor Spirit Restriction Order No.2.

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