Number of legal guns shoots up to record high in North Yorkshire

New Home Office statistics show that in March this year there were 23,254 licenced firearms in the area.
New Home Office statistics show that in March this year there were 23,254 licenced firearms in the area.

The number of legally-held guns in North Yorkshire has shot up to a record high, new figures reveal.

New Home Office statistics show that in March this year there were 23,254 licenced firearms in the area –45% more than 10 years ago.

This means there are 2,837 legal firearms for every 100,000 people, up 39% from when comparable records began in 2009. That’s higher than any point over the last decade.

The figures do not include shotguns, which are licenced separately.

Under current legislation, one licence can apply to multiple weapons and must be renewed every five years.

According to the data, 6,847 firearms licences were on issue from North Yorkshire Police as of 31 March, each covering 3.4 guns on average.

In the financial year 2018-19, officers logged 333 applications for new licences. Nearly all (97%) of these were granted and only 10 refused.

A further 706 licences were renewed and 13 revoked.

The non-profit Gun Control Network called the steady increase in legal firearms “a problem for us all”.

The organisation’s chairwoman, Gill Marshall-Andrews, said: “We know there is a strong correlation between the number of guns in circulation and the number of deaths and injuries caused by guns.”

The GCN said four-fifths of female gun deaths occur in domestic incidents, most of which involve licensed weapons.

But the British Association for Shooting and Conservation said the number of legal guns used in crime is “miniscule and statistically insignificant”.

Firearms director Bill Harriman added: “The UK rightly has some of the strictest firearms laws in the world.

“We are proud of our legislation and work well with the Home Office to ensure public safety is of the highest priority.”

Police force areas in rural regions had a consistently higher number of firearms per 100,000 people than in cities.

The Home Office attributes this to their lower populations, and said weapons owned in the countryside are likely to be used for game keeping and farming, as well as leisure activities such as target shooting.

Article by data reporter Alex Shaw