Ryedale charity’s delight at £147,500 lottery grant boost

Andrew Cleaton, Trusts and Foundations Coordinator, and volunteer Rebecca Anderson celebrate the Encephalitis Society's �147,500 grant from the National Lottery Community Fund.
Andrew Cleaton, Trusts and Foundations Coordinator, and volunteer Rebecca Anderson celebrate the Encephalitis Society's �147,500 grant from the National Lottery Community Fund.

Families whose lives have been affected by a devastating brain condition have been given a major boost, thanks to a grant from The National Lottery Community Fund.

The Encephalitis Society, based in Malton, has been given £147,500 of National Lottery funding to develop its three-year Life After Encephalitis project and “engage with more diverse, hard to reach and under-represented groups.”

The grant, raised by National Lottery players, also contributes towards the cost of a new staff member to help meet the rising demand for its support services among individuals affected by the condition – inflammation of the brain – and their families.

Dr Ava Easton, Chief Executive of the Encephalitis Society, said: “This generous award from The National Lottery Community Fund is the perfect start to World Encephalitis Day and our 25th anniversary year,” said.

“It arrives at such a critical stage for us as a charity – demand for the support we provide is growing and the way that we deliver that help is changing as well.

The National Lottery grant will also help run a range of events to bring together people affected by encephalitis, their families, and healthcare professionals. This will provide them with the opportunity to share experiences and support each other through recovery, so they can have a positive outlook.

Joe Ferns, UK Knowledge and Portfolio Director at The National Lottery Community Fund, said: “Thanks to National Lottery players, social events and online resources will bring together people affected by this condition. They will be able to share experiences and support each other to thrive by overcoming challenges in their lives and reaching their full potential.”

Visit www.encephaltis.info for more information.