Letter: Concern on plan detail

South Cliff Bowling Club
South Cliff Bowling Club

I have been talking with friends who are members of this historic club, and wish to make the following points regarding South Cliff.

1) Does the council fully appreciate the financial issues involved in building a flat-green bowls surface? Records from 1908 indicate the original club green was badly constructed by the Scarborough Corporation, because it was soon full of clover and weeds which severely hindered the running of the woods and jack.

2) Bowls England, I am told, strongly suggest a bowling green needs a substantial drainage system, maintenance by people with horticultural rather than gardening.

3) It has been “aired” that a new club house/pavilion on the proposed College Avenue/Deepdale development could be shared with the tennis club. On the face of it this has much merit, but what about the separate clubs projected calendar of events – which may coincide?

4) The proposed new site for six tennis courts and the bowling green are “pencilled” in to be on land with a historical geological concern that dates back to Weaponness Hill (now Oliver’s Mount) being in the hands of the wealthy Oliver family. Why did they wish to rent on the top of the hill one may ask? At the time, rights of way to the top of Weaponness included “middle aisle” (the path between the existing bowling green and the former lower tennis courts) central to an area that many locals use for rambling, dog walking etc.

5) The council had recently accepted South Cliff Bowling Club as an asset of community value, and re-siting the clubhouse, huts and green seems a backward step. Regular visitors from other clubs would feel the extra walking distance to the Spa, South Cliff gardens and beach.

6) The development would add to the loss of more of Scarborough’s heritage.

The club house and the tennis club centre court that hosted Fred Perry, Gonzales etc in years gone by, could be added to a list of heritage taken away.

7) Dog walkers of all ages who would hate to lose this tranquil open space.

John Stather

Scalby Road