Scarborough's young musicians reunited for first Christmas concert since Covid disruption

For the first time in 18 months students from Scarborough Music Centre have come together to play a Christmas concert.

The concert at Queen Street Methodist Church, Scarborough. (Photo: North Yorkshire County Council)
The concert at Queen Street Methodist Church, Scarborough. (Photo: North Yorkshire County Council)

Students have been working hard since September, rehearsing together for this Christmas gala which featured all of the ensembles - Junior Strings, BIG, Guitar Ensemble, Junior Concert Band, SAYStO, Ebony, Jazz Train and Easy Band.

The concert took place at Queen Street Methodist Church, Scarborough.

Ralph Alder, Music Centre Manager for the Scarborough area, said: "Over the past 18 months there have been huge changes as we saw some of our senior members leave to pursue further studies at universities and colleges and we wish them well.

"I would like to thank the staff at Queen Street Church for all their help and support, whether this be serving refreshments or helping us with equipment. My thanks also goes out to everyone involved for the continued musical support of the children and their music making with us at Scarborough Area Music Centre."

The county music service works hard to make music accessible to all children and provides one of the most comprehensive services nationally. During lockdown it delivered more online music lessons than any other service in the North of England according to the Arts Council.

It works with children and young people in the majority of schools across North Yorkshire delivering whole class music lessons, instrumental teaching and also runs six Saturday morning music centres in the county for ensemble work. It also runs a County Youth Orchestra, County Big Band and County Choir.

County Councillor Patrick Mulligan, Executive Member for Education and Skills said: "It’s great to see our young musicians come together after being unable to play for such a long time. Covid has affected all types of music making and it’s a real positive to be able to see young people come together and make music again to such a high standard.

"Being involved in music-making can change children’s lives and in North Yorkshire our music service still works with over 90 per cent of schools across the county, even in remote rural areas, delivering whole-class lessons and also instrumental teaching."