10 sculptures by the artist who made Freddie Gilroy on Scarborough's North Bay

Ray Lonsdale, the sculptor who created Scarborough's beloved Freddie Gilroy sculpture on North Bay, revealed a new, similar piece in Cumbria earlier this month.

Monday, 19th August 2019, 4:00 pm
10 sculptures by the artist who made Freddie Gilroy on Scarborough's North Bay

The statue, called Sunset for the common man but nicknamed Big Fella by residents, was commissioned by Silloth businessman Peter Richardson and depicts a man sitting on a bench looking out over the Solway with his dog. It is the twenty fourth sculpture from the artist who has also made several others in the Scarborough area. Here are ten of his giant sculptures across the North, which is your favourite?

Based on a retired miner who was one of the first soldiers to liberate the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp at the end of World War Two. Maureen Robinson, of Scarborough, purchasedthe giant statue for 48,000 in 2011.
Commissioned by Silloth businessman Peter Richardson, who died last year, it depicts a man sitting on a bench looking out over the Solway with his dog.
Pictured is the artist with Maureen Robinson, who bought both this and Ray's two other sculptures in Scarborough, to be enjoyed by the town.
This sculpture was installed in 2012 and depicts a young apprentice struggling to lift a barrel while the smuggler does so with ease.
Known by the nickname Tommy, this sculpture weights 1.2 tonnes and depicts a World War One soldier seated on an ammunition box looking downwards. Eleven 'O' One refers to the first minute of peace after the armistice.
The sculpture is inspired by Private Michael Duffy, of the Durham Light Infantry, who helped lay explosives beneath German lines in World War One. He died aged 19 along with 10,000 others on the Messines Ridge on June 7, 1917.
The sculpture was unveiled in 2013. It was made in honour of those who worked in collieries across the area.
A sculpture in the artist's home village to commemorate the mining industry. The artist passes it on his way to and from his studio.
This 10ft sculpture was inspired by a 1950s photograph and was designed as a lasting tribute to fishermen who died at sea.
Created to honour the RNLI crew and staff who worked at the Seaham Harbour station up until its closure in 1979. It shows a lifeboat skipper battling the waves during a rescue.
Unveiled to mark the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage, the sculpture depicts Emily Davison - the suffragette who was trampled to death by the king's horse - while on hunger strike in prison, throwing her food on the ground.