Group’s bid to gain UNESCO Global Geopark status for East Yorkshire

A local group is investigating the possibilities of applying to UNESCO to secure Global Geopark status for East Yorkshire.

Thursday, 1st July 2021, 9:10 am
The proposed Geopark would complement the bid for Yorkshire Wolds to become an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Map submitted.The proposed Geopark would complement the bid for Yorkshire Wolds to become an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Map submitted.
The proposed Geopark would complement the bid for Yorkshire Wolds to become an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Map submitted.The proposed Geopark would complement the bid for Yorkshire Wolds to become an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Map submitted.

The group, called Towards a Geopark for East Yorkshire believes the area’s rich geological and archaeological sites, along with its biodiversity and strong heritage, could earn the prestigious international status.

Global Geoparks are given to areas of outstanding and unique geology and landscape in recognition of their wealth of historical heritage, tourism, and investment into local economies and people.

The proposed Geopark would run along the River Derwent in the West and North to Filey Brigg, down the coast in the East to Spurn Point and then along the Humber and Ouse in the South. This would encompass the Vales of York and Pickering, the Yorkshire Wolds and Holderness.

The Geopark would complement the recent bid for Yorkshire Wolds to become an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The group’s chair, Richard Myerscough, said that support is growing from a number of individuals, local, regional and national agencies, universities and other bodies.

He said: “The status would lead to international recognition that the area is a Geopark.

“There are many important geological sites in this area, including the chalk areas, Filey Brigg, Speeton, Flamborough and Spurn, while Holderness is the only area left of Doggerland – an area that existed at the end of the ice age.

“This area is rich in archaeology right across the region, including chariot finds in Pocklington and the Wolds.

“We are also rich in biology, great landscapes, heritage, tourism, and wellbeing.

“The progress towards Geopark status has many hurdles and there’s procedures to follow before we declare ourselves a Geopark prior to the actual application to UNESCO.

“It could take five years or more before we get to that particular point.”

Anyone who wants to get involved in the group can email [email protected] for more details.