Whitby locals object over plan to convert five-storey residential building into holiday lets

Plans to convert a five-storey residential building into holiday lets have met with opposition in Whitby.
Plans to convert a five-storey residential building into holiday lets have met with opposition in Whitby.Plans to convert a five-storey residential building into holiday lets have met with opposition in Whitby.
Plans to convert a five-storey residential building into holiday lets have met with opposition in Whitby.

The proposed conversion of a five-storey residential building next to Whitby’s Pannett Park has met with opposition from local residents.

If approved, the property on 7 Broomfield Terrace would see the creation of a separate holiday let on each floor starting in the basement and finishing in the attic.

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At the front of the property, the garden would be modified to create stairs and access with retaining walls, whilst at the back, apartments three and four would have balconies built.

The planning authority has not yet drafted a report, but locals have expressed their opposition to the plans.

Whitby Town Council said it was objecting on the grounds that it would be “out of keeping with the area”, because of its impact on nearby Listed buildings, and based on health safety concerns about “only one exit”.

It said it also supported concerns raised by the Highway Authority which has recommended that the plans be refused based on an “absence of adequate on-site parking”

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The HA said a lack of parking space “would likely result in vehicles being parked outside the site to the detriment of the free flow of traffic and road safety”.

Whitby Civic Society also lodged an objection because “the property is in the town’s conservation area and the proposed changes, particularly the balconies and dormers, will adversely affect the appearance and character of the Terrace from the front and rear”.

The society added: “This looks like a significant over-development with adverse effects on the amenity of existing residents through noise from balconies, increased competition for parking places, and refuse.”

Similar concerns about the impact on residential amenity was raised by the council’s environmental health officer who did not object but recommended that conditions be attached.

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The council’s residential regulation manager did not object to the plans.

A design statement submitted by the applicant, Mr M. Estill, states: “The proposed alterations and extensions will be designed to be fully compliant with the building regulations.”

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