Here’s where you can go on holiday this summer - in the UK and abroad

Monday, 6th July 2020, 4:55 pm
Updated Monday, 6th July 2020, 4:56 pm
Will you be going abroad this summer? (Photo: Shutterstock)

Several strict lockdown restrictions came to an end in England on Saturday (4 July), as pubs, bars, restaurants and hotels were finally allowed to reopen after more than three months of closure.

The changes saw rules on overnight stays in England permitted, while travelling abroad was given the green light for a number of foreign countries, meaning Brits can now escape for some summer sun.

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But where are holidays allowed? Here’s what you need to know.

Where can I go on holiday in the UK?

From 4 July, two households of any size in England are now allowed to meet up indoors and stay overnight.

The new rules also mean that people are permitted to stay overnight in self-contained accommodation, within England, as the hospitality sector can now start to reopen.

As such, people can book overnight stays in hotels, bed and breakfasts, campsites and caravan parks, providing shared facilities are kept clean.

If you visit other parts of the UK, including Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, you must adhere to the laws and guidance imposed by the devolved nations.

In Scotland, two households are not allowed to meet indoors until 10 July, or stay overnight.

However, self-contained self-catering holiday accommodation, including camping and caravan sites, have now started to take bookings, and all other holiday accommodation is expected to open from 15 July.

In Wales, residents can start booking holidays in self-contained accommodation from 13 July, while as of 6 July, people are now allowed to travel in and around Wales for the first time since lockdown was imposed in March.

In Northern Ireland, self-catering and non self-catering accommodation is already open. However, overnight stays with another household, outside of support bubbles, are not currently allowed.

Can I go on holiday abroad?

Travelling abroad is now permitted again, with the 14-day self-isolation policy for any travellers returning to England from select destinations overseas no longer in force.

The UK government has published a list of 59 countries, including France, Spain and Italy, that travellers from England can visit from 4 July onwards, and will be exempt from quarantine on their return after 10 July.

The Department for Transport (DfT) has indicated that reciprocal arrangements between England and overseas nations have not been confirmed, but said it is the government's "expectation" that a number of exempted countries will also not require UK arrivals to self-isolate.

However, there is no guarantee that foreign nations will not have quarantine restrictions in place.

All travellers who arrive in the UK from abroad will still have to supply contact information to allow health officials to trace them should someone they have been in contact with display symptoms, or test positive, for coronavirus.

The updated travel restrictions are only applicable on travel to England, with the devolved nations setting out their own individual approaches.

The DfT confirmed in a statement that the devolved administrations “will set out their own approach", meaning passengers who arrive in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will have to follow the laws and guidance that apply in these areas.

Which countries can I travel to?

From 10 July, passengers arriving from the following 59 countries will not be required to self-isolate on arrival into England, unless they have visited or stopped in any other country or territory in the preceding 14 days.

This list will be kept "under constant review", meaning quarantine measures could be reinstated in the event the risk to public health increases.

More countries may be added over the coming days following further discussions between the UK and international partners.

Here is the full list:

Andorra

Antigua and Barbuda

Aruba

Australia

Austria

Bahamas

Barbados

Belgium

Bonair, Sint Eustatius and Saba

Croatia

Curaçao

Cyprus

Czech Republic

Denmark

Dominica

Faroe Islands

Fiji

Finland

France

French Polynesia

Germany

Greece

Greenland

Grenada

Guadeloupe

Hong Kong

Hungary

Iceland

Italy

Jamaica

Japan

Liechtenstein

Lithuania

Luxembourg

Macau

Malta

Mauritius

Monaco

Netherlands

New Caledonia

New Zealand

Norway

Poland

Réunion

San Marino

Serbia

Seychelles

South Korea

Spain

St Barthélemy

St Kitts and Nevis

St Lucia

St Pierre and Miquelon

Switzerland

Taiwan

Trinidad and Tobago

Turkey

Vatican City

Vietnam