Snow storms will hit parts of the UK today - the Met Office forecast in full

Monday, 11th January 2021, 12:29 pm
Updated Monday, 11th January 2021, 12:30 pm

The UK is set to be hit by a brutal weatherfront this week, as sub-zero temperatures continue in parts of the country, drawing comparisons with 2018’s ‘Beast from the East’.

Temperatures could be set to drop to -2C amid outbreaks of snow in the north of the UK, and the Met Office has said heavy snow could be on its way by the end of the month.

Where will snow and ice hit?

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The Met Office has currently issued a yellow warning for Northern England and Scotland.

The warning covers the whole of Scotland, and the majority of the north of England, extending as far as Sheffield and Manchester. The weather service has said ice is expected to form in these areas following low temperatures overnight.

You can read the full details of the weather warning on the Met Office website.

Heavy snow in north of Scotland

Motorists in the north of Scotland have been warned about the road conditions after freezing temperatures.

Police said in a statement: “Driving conditions across the North East are challenging this morning following heavy overnight snow.

"Motorists are reminded to allow extra time for their journeys, to drive according to the conditions and ensure windows and lights are clear of snow and ice before setting off."

What is the Beast from the East?

The ‘Beast from the East’ is a phrase used to describe cold and wintry conditions in the UK as a result of weather patterns, and easterly winds originating from the near continent.

When pressure is high over Scandinavia, the UK tends to experience polar continental air mass, bringing cold air from the Eurassian landmass, which brings the cold and wintry conditions known as the ‘Beast from the East’.

The UK experienced a severe cold wave in 2018, where Anticyclone Harmut brought widespread unusually low temperatures and heavy snowfall to large areas.